Becka's blog rotating header image loading ... please wait....

Posts from ‘May, 2012’

Scrap project update


We will be having some special visitors coming later this summer so we have been working little by little to get the children's room organized before they arrive. I finally have finished organizing all my fabric scraps and have the larger pieces wrapped on the cardboards and stored by color on this little storage unit:

The smaller pieces of fabric were cut into scraps and I have them sorted by size in bags in the little bins. Some of the bins also contain yarn and other craft supplies.

Since I could finally see what was available in my stash I gathered up some purples and greens and made this little lap quilt for a birthday present:

As usual Adelaide was very helpful in the process:

This dress was given to me a while back.

I really liked the fabric but not the way the dress fit. Recently I cut it apart and recycled it into a new summer top:

Have you been doing any recycling or stash reducing projects lately?

Becka


Print this post Print this post
E-mail this post to a friend
Share this post on Facebook

If you enjoyed this post, get my RSS feed or get my posts by e-mail


Baking and a boy


I've been baking most of our breads this summer and have tried several new recipes. We were invited to a dinner for a friend who recently moved out of state and I was asked to bring some rolls. I brought these Herbed Oatmeal Pan Rolls which are delicious.

About the only change I made to the recipe was to use Italian Seasoning instead of the individual herbs. I do think you could cut back a bit on the butter and they would still be very good.

I have used this recipe for French Bread dough from Mennonite Girls Can Cook several times. It makes very tasty loaf bread and the dough can also be used for Stromboli, Pizza Crusts, Cheeseburger Buns, etc. I've been making it with half white whole wheat flour and half bread flour. The French Bread loaves can be sliced, buttered, and then frozen so you can just remove the number of slices required for a meal and then toast. These are nice with a casserole meal.

Another experiment was a loaf of whole wheat bread using this recipe from King Arthur Flour. I prepared the dough in the bread machine and baked it in the oven. The bread was nice and light and not a bit dense or crumbly even without the addition of dough enhancers.

I try to get my baking pretty well done in the mornings before Ryan arrives so I can keep my eye on him. He is now walking more than he is crawling. He definitely toddles and still takes a few tumbles each day. This past week one of his favorite places to play was under the exersaucer. He thought it was lots of fun to roll a ball around in there.

I hope all of you are having a lovely weekend.

Becka


Print this post Print this post
E-mail this post to a friend
Share this post on Facebook

If you enjoyed this post, get my RSS feed or get my posts by e-mail


A couple of good things


This week Aldi has a lot of good deals on produce, such as cucumbers for 29 cents, mushrooms for 59 cents, baby carrots for 49 cents, and others I can't remember at the moment. :) So you might want to check it out. Our sales at Aldi run from Wednesday until the following Tuesday. Another item I have been buying at Aldi is bananas. Since there are just two of us eating bananas at our house, very often some would get over ripe. This is not always a problem since the over ripe ones are good for baking. But, recently DelMonte has come up with these special bags which help slow down the ripening. They really do work. I have kept bananas for over a week before they even start to freckle. I'm sure other stores carry bananas in these bags too, but I have found them at Aldi and wanted to share the fact that they really do work.

Another thing I want to share is this recipe for Ranch Dressing. I have found several recipes similar to this on-line and it really is good. It is DH's favorite salad dressing. It would also be good for a quick potato salad dressing.

Good Ranch Dressing

1 cup mayonnaise
1/4 cup sour cream
1/4 cup buttermilk
1 1/2 tsps. dried parsley (or a small handful of fresh, chopped)
1 tsp. dried dill (or a small handful of fresh, chopped)
1 tsp. onion powder
1/2 tsp. garlic powder or garlic salt
salt and pepper to taste

Combine all ingredients and whisk together. Store in refrigerator.

I have lots of fresh dill and parsley in the garden right now, so this is what I have been using. I have tried making this with lowfat mayonnaise but it was a little too thick. You can thin it by adding a bit more buttermilk or even some regular milk.

Have a blessed weekend!

Becka


Print this post Print this post
E-mail this post to a friend
Share this post on Facebook

If you enjoyed this post, get my RSS feed or get my posts by e-mail


The Midwestern Country Cookbook


A number of years ago I discovered The Midwestern Country Cookbook by Marilyn Kluger at the library and checked it out. I liked it so much that I asked for my own copy for Christmas that year. If you enjoy "reading" cookbooks you should find this one a delight. Mrs. Kluger writes in charming detail about growing up out in the country near both sets of grandparents. Interwoven in the family stories are recipes that she associates with different people and different events.

I love reading cookbooks with stories about the recipes. A modern cookbook of this type is Southern Plate by Christy Jordan. Christy tells delightful stories about her southern family and their food traditions. Another such cookbook that comes to mind is Jewish Cooking in America by Joan Nathan. I have checked this book out of the library several times and am always facinated by the stories of how these precious recipes were treasured and preserved throughout the years.

I have several recipes which I received from my aunt Nana (this recipe), my grandmother, and one from my great-grandmother. My great-grandmother, Margaret Alice Copeland, lived with my grandmother and passed away when I was a young elementary school-age child. The recipe passed along from her is called Mrs. Monday's Soup. It received that name because Great Grandma overheard the recipe being narrated while she was listening in on the party-line! From what I understand that was a rather common pass time back in the day. :) This recipe isn't outstanding, but it is something that goes together quickly and that can be made from ingredients that many people keep on hand. It is written as it was narrated to me, with my changes at the end.

Mrs. Monday's Soup

Take three or four large potatoes and dice them in fairly large pieces. Put just enough water on to cover them and cook. Meanwhile take about two Tablespoons of butter in a skillet and cut up an onion in the butter and cook these until you think they're done. Then add this to the cooked potatoes. (You may have to drain some water off of them) Then add about one cup tomato juice and stir up. Remember this is soup so it should be soupy. Salt and pepper to taste.

*Note: I often add a stalk or two of chopped celery including the leaves with the onion. I don't usually keep tomato juice on hand so I use half tomato sauce and half water to replace the tomato juice.

Here is a picture of Grandma Copeland:

Do you have any family recipes that have been handed down from your ancestors or any "story" cookbooks that you enjoy?

Becka


Print this post Print this post
E-mail this post to a friend
Share this post on Facebook

If you enjoyed this post, get my RSS feed or get my posts by e-mail